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Alsi ki Chutney (Flaxseed Chutney)

Flax seeds are tiny powerhouses of nutrition well known for their high content of omega-3 fatty acid alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) , an essential fatty acid which means that your body cannot produce it, and so you need to obtain it from the food you eat. It is important to grind the seeds before eating them as the oil is locked up inside the fibrous structure of the seed and it cannot be released when eaten whole.

Flax seeds also have high amounts of protein as well as soluble and insoluble fiber. Soluble fiber helps regulate blood sugar and cholesterol levels. It also promotes digestive health by feeding your beneficial gut bacteria. When mixed with water this soluble fiber becomes very thick and combined with the insoluble fiber content, flax seeds become a natural laxative, promoting good bowel movement, preventing constipation, and reducing your risk of diabetes. It’s recommended to drink plenty of water when eating these seeds because of their high fiber content. For people who are not used to eating a lot of fiber, incorporating flax seeds too quickly can cause mild digestive problems. These include bloating, gas, abdominal pain, and nausea. Chutneys are a great way to avoiding these problems as they are eaten along with a lot of other vegetables and pulses in our traditional Indian meals.

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Ansa Phansachi Bhaji

Fruits are a great source of energy and nutrients like vitamins and minerals. Additionally, fruits supply dietary fiber, which may help lower the incidence of cardiovascular disease and reduce unnecessary weight gain. Fruits are a source of phytochemicals that function as antioxidants, phytoestrogens, and anti-inflammatory agents and support protective mechanisms for the body. Coconut is a great source of natural fats and lots of fiber. Cooking fruits, or vegetables for that matter, causes the loss of a great amount of water-soluble vitamins, and the longer a food is cooked, the greater the loss of nutrients. Raw foods are more nutritious than cooked foods because enzymes are also destroyed in the cooking process. Enzymes are heat sensitive and deactivate easily when exposed to high temperatures. So, it’s best to eat fruit uncooked and in its natural form, but we can always enjoy a traditional food once in a while.

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Raw Mango Kadhi

Raw mango is available for almost 5 to 7 months of the year and is a very versatile ingredient. It is used in preserves, chaats, chutneys, main dishes, and beverages. It is high in vitamin C, calcium, magnesium which is useful for releasing toxins from the body. Raw mangoes are also high in niacin, which helps boost cardiovascular health.

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Kairi (Raw/Green Mango) Chutney

Kairi (raw/green) mango comes in different levels of sourness and is available for almost 6 to 8 months of the year. It is a very versatile ingredient. used in pickles, preserves, chaats, chutneys, main dishes, and beverages. It is high in vitamin C, calcium, and magnesium which are great to detoxify the body. Raw mangoes are also high in niacin, which helps boost cardiovascular health.

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Upma with Vegetables

Wheat has been used in various forms, especially ground roughly or fine for centuries. Some people find it difficult to digest wheat because of the gluten in it. Wheat is easier to digest when eaten with a lot of vegetables that contain the fibre. Wheat contains relatively high amounts of protein, dietary fiber, carbohydrates and minerals like calcium. It also contains micronutrients like magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and B vitamins. Wheat kernels have three parts: the bran (outer layer), the germ (core of the kernel), and the endosperm (starchy middle layer). White flour is made by removing the bran and the germ leaving only the endosperm which contains only protein, carbohydrates, and a small number of B vitamins and minerals. The bran and germ layers that are removed are rich in fiber, B vitamins, antioxidants, phytochemicals, and minerals like iron, copper, zinc, and magnesium. Therefore, it is best to eat whole wheat than refined flour/maida as well as eat it with a lot of vegetables.

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Allum Chutney with Tomatoes (Ginger Tomato Chutney)

Tomatoes are a versatile ingredient and are rich in fiber and other nutrients like vit C and lycopene. Tomatoes grown with heritage seeds are tastier and more nutritious. In fact, the tastier the tomatoes, the more the nutrition. Tomatoes have an anti-inflammatory effect that protects muscles and may help athletes recover after exercise.

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Methi Batatyachi Sukki Bhaji (Fenugreek Leaves with Potato Vegetable)

Fenugreek leaves are very low in calories and fats, have a low glycemic index, are a rich source of dietary fiber and are an excellent source of several vital antioxidants and minerals like folic acid, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin E, carotenes, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, selenium, and manganese. The soluble and insoluble dietary fiber content in the leaves aid in digestion and smooth bowel movements. Methi leaves contain certain chemicals that aid in insulin production. These leaves are an excellent sources of vitamin K, which is important to help strengthen bone mass and prevent osteoporosis. Fresh methi greens help prevent iron deficiency anemia and may help protect a person from cardiovascular diseases, asthma, and colon and prostate cancers. These greens work as an antibacterial and aid in the cure of Alzheimer’s disease. So all in all, it’s a good ingredient to have in your diet on a regular basis.

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Mode aleli Chawli chi Bhaji with Coconut (Sprouted Black-eyed Beans Curry with Coconut)

Pulses are a great low-fat source of protein with high levels of fibre. Pulses contain both soluble and insoluble fibre and one cup of cooked pulses gives you more than half the amount of fibre you need for the entire day. Pulses also contain important vitamins and minerals like iron, potassium, calcium, folate, zinc, iron, and magnesium. Pulses also contain resistant starch, a type of carbohydrate that behaves like fibre in the body, and this helps improve gut health. Soaking and rinsing dry beans before cooking can help to reduce the flatulence that may be caused by these carbohydrates.

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Mode aleli Chawli chi Bhaji with Coconut and Onion (Sprouted Black-eyed Beans Curry with Coconut and Onion)

The coconut masala in this dish adds fiber and fat keeping you satiated for a long time. Sprouted beans are more nutritious and they require much less cooking time. Sprouts are rich in digestible energy, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, proteins, and phytochemicals, as these are necessary for a germinating plant to grow and are also essential to human health. Sprouting breaks down complex compounds into a simpler form which is why sprouts are also called pre-digested foods. Sprouts provide a good supply of Vitamins A, E & C plus B complex which help in digestion and the release of energy. They are also essential for the healing and repair of cells. However, vitamins are very perishable and so fresh sprouts have a higher vitamin content. Some sprouts can yield vitamin contents 30 times higher than the dry bean.

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Moogache Boon (Green Gram Porridge)

Moong dal is packed with protein and is an integral part of the Indian diet. It is rich in potassium, which helps lower blood pressure and protects against muscle cramping. It also contains minerals like magnesium, iron, and copper and dietary fiber. When eaten, moong dal helps produce a fatty acid called butyrate in the gut. This helps maintain the health of the intestinal walls. The dal has anti-inflammatory properties that prevent and accumulation of gas. Rich in B-complex vitamins, moong dal helps your body break carbohydrates down to glucose, and produce usable energy for your body. It cooks fast and is light and easy to digest. So all in all, it’s a great ingredient to include in your diet more often than not.

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